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Chaga Organic Chocolate – 250gm

$14.50

Wild Chaga Chocolate! A gourmet blend of sustainably harvested wild Chaga Fungi (Inonotus obliquus), organic fair trade cocoa, organic cane sugar and organic vanilla. Yum! Brew this up and serve it as a hot or iced Chaga Chocolate drink. For all you mocha lovers out there add a shot of espresso and voila! One 250 gram package contains enough mix for ten delicious servings. Chagalicious!

 

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Description

Wild Chaga is a slow growing wild fungi/mushroom that grows on living birch trees. It has long been documented for its use in the treatment and prevention of cancer in Russia. Ancient traditional medicine from Russian, Chinese, Finnish, European and first nations in North America discuss historical use of wild chaga for spiritual and medicinal properties as well as other uses. These elusive wild fungi are often referred to as “king of the forest” or “mushroom of immortality” referring to chaga’s many health benefiting properties. Chaga is said to be the second highest anti-oxidant in the world.

Chaga Biology
Wild Chaga Fungi (Inonotus obliquus) is found in the world’s northern regions. Northern Chaga tends to be smaller in size, denser and takes longer to grow than wild Chaga growing in southern Canada and the United States. This elusive fungi has a unique symbiotic relationship with its host the birch tree. Some also call it a parasitic relationship. One thing we have learned from years of harvesting and studying the biology of wild Chaga across Northern Canada is that without birch there would be no Chaga! It is hard to tell if Chaga actually causes its host tree’s eventual death or not as there are many factors involved. When the host birch tree dies so does the Chaga growing with it. Once this happens a rare, special event occurs in which the fruiting body erupts for a short time on the trunk of the birch tree. This fruiting body looks nothing like the sterile conk of Chaga that we collect for tea. Instead it forms a thick 1-2 inch layer comprised of thousands of tiny spores that blow away in the wind or are carried by insects to new birch trees. Thus the life cycle of Chaga begins once again.